Just about twenty years of soul-catching: an interview with Dimitri Bortnikov and Svetlana Pironko (Betimes Books)

VF

Betimes Books founder Svetlana Pironko (“I chose long-sellers over bestsellers” ) has just published Soul Catcher, her translation of Repas de morts, by Dimitri Bortnikov, whose agent she was twenty years ago.

Dimitri Bortnikov and Svetlana Pironko just about twenty years ago. © Svetlana Pironko

Svetlana, Dimitri, you two met about twenty years ago… In what circumstances?

Svetlana: We met by chance, in circumstances that had nothing to do with publishing. Each of us helped, separately, a couple of mutual friends who were in the process of adopting a child in Russia. When they finally brought the little boy to Paris, they invited us to lunch to thank us and so that we could meet him. Besides our common origins, they knew that Dimitri was a writer and I a literary agent. But for both Dimitri and me it was a surprise. I had heard of him, because he already was the finalist of two major Russian literary awards for his first novel, but I had never read his works. A few days after that lunch, Dimitri sent me the novel. I read it in one sitting and phoned him the next day to offer representation. He accepted.

Dimitri: That meeting – I have no recollection of it. Nothing. A blank. A hole in the diary. I don’t have too many memories… Sometimes I say to myself that a still-born child would have more memories than me. But yes. I do remember perfectly the first time I saw Svetlana in her element. In her agency. That – yes. I signed a copy of Syndrome de Fritz for her. In a café, not far from the agency. Very close, yes… At a fag distance from it. It’s bizarre, our memory… I remember her dress, very very light, her suntan, and what I wrote in my dedication. And then we signed the representation contract and so on and so on.

And then, thanks to Svetlana, my second novel was translated into French, and released by Le Seuil.

What made you become a literary agent and a writer, respectively?

Svetlana: After studying at the École supérieure d’interprètes de traducteurs in Paris, I worked as a freelance translator and interpreter, mostly for international organisations and French companies. I specialised in legal and business translation. It was an exciting time, but after ten years or so, I felt that I wanted to go back to my first love – books, literature. I wanted to open a bookshop in Paris, but the project fell through for “logistical” reasons, and I decided to do a Master’s degree in publishing et the ESCP Europe Business School. The first job I found after graduation was in a literary agency. I wanted to be an editor rather than an agent, but I said to myself that selling rights was another way of selling books – and also a way of making books travel, so to speak… Nine months later, I became a partner at Lora Fountain & Associates Literary Agency in Paris. That’s where I was working when I met Dimitri.

Dimitri: What was I doing at the time… Not much. I was certainly scribbling, but rather aimlessly, without much application… I was taking care of my son. That – yes. And so much! But literature – no, not that much… And I was working as a cook for a Russian countess. Or maybe it was earlier… I don’t know anymore. And let me tell you – it is easier for a man to find an old pair of trousers in which he’s never farted than to find his real memories. Really! Look at Proust…

Svetlana: Sorry, but I must re-establish “historical accuracy” here! At the time, Dimitri was working at a new novel, Sleeping Beauty, which I later represented as an agent. It was published in Russia in 2005. It will soon come out in the French translation from Noir sur Blanc Editions. Sleeping Beauty is still one of my favourite novels by Dimitri. Therefore, I must mention it!

Did your literary relationship form around your common Russian or Est European roots, at least partly?

Svetlana: I was born and grew up in Central Asia, in Kazakhstan. I was 15 years old when my family moved to Russia. My cultural background is Russian, but Russia isn’t a country where I ever felt at home. I started learning French as a child, by choice. I decided that I wanted to live in Paris one day, after a “corrupting” read (A Moveable Feast, to name the guilty party). I moved to Paris at the age of 24, not without some adventures. Over thirty years ago… Before the collapse of the Soviet Union. It’s in Paris that I feel at home. The French language is the language of my heart – or, as Albert Camus said, “my homeland, it’s the French language”.

Did our literary relationship form around our Russian roots? Naturally – at the beginning. I couldn’t have read Dimitri’s first novel and become his agent if I hadn’t spoken Russian and hadn’t been familiar with – and sensitive to – the realities he was describing. Actually, we couldn’t have met in the same circumstances… Serendipity… But I think that our literary affinities go beyond our origins. After all, my experience of life in the Soviet Union and in France was quite different from Dimitri’s.

Dimitri: I was born in Russia, in Samara. But never, ever wanted to become a writer. Never. Anything but. Doctor – yes. Chemist – yes. But literature – making literature – certainly not. It was niet. It isn’t a coincidence that I love Nietzsche – his name begins with Niet! But “dimitriking” aside… Seriously – I am a man of another age. Of a very another age. Everything that is ancient – yes. Socrates – yes. Bach – oh, yes! Villon – yes twice. Shakespeare – Da three times. Hamlet! Richard III! Shooting stars! And, particularly, the Bible. That – never tired of! Yes. The rest of it – no… I swear! Let me be cursed with a bonsai erection for the rest of my life if I lie… Contemporary literature and its sawdust… No. All that showing the bottom of your pants and babbling and whimpering… It is comical sometimes and ridiculous – always. What I’m interested in, at most – is what precedes the language. The silence before the soul dresses it with words. Or before it undresses. Something like that…

You have never lost sight of each other since that first encounter… How has your literary relationship evolved?

Svetlana: We have been in touch most of the time, if not all the time – there were periods when we weren’t seeing each other much, but it has never been the case of “out of sight, out of mind”. I have been following Dimitri’s career even after I stopped being his agent, around the time when I moved to Dublin some fifteen years ago.

But I never gave up the idea of getting him published in English. I am nothing if not persistent!

Dimitri: My career… It is quite funny! A flee has more “career” than me! But it is true what you say, Svet… Particularly regarding “I am nothing if not persistent!”

But translator and publisher, it isn’t the same thing and agent and friend, is it?

Svetlana: When I was an agent (I created my own primary agency in Dublin, Author Rights Agency Ltd.), I was dreaming of getting Dimitri published in English. When I became a publisher, I started dreaming of publishing him myself, as soon as the publishing house’s finances allowed. Actually, I did mention it to Dimitri, and he was all for it. But the idea of translating one of his novels myself never crossed my mind until January 2020, when I met the Cultural attaché of the French embassy in Dublin Miriam Diallo and her colleague Stéphanie Muchint, the literature officer.

They have enthusiastically supported my idea of publishing French authors in Ireland, and they chose Dimitri Bortnikov among the five names I had on my list. To my great joy.

2020 was the year of the 50th anniversary of the Francophonie, and they wanted to mark it by launching a book translated from the French, at the Alliance française Dublin.

The idea appealed to me, but raised two issues: time (needed to do the translation) and money (needed to finance it). It is often the case…

It was Stéphanie Muchint who suggested I translate the book myself.

My first reaction was: “Oh no, I couldn’t do it – Dimitri is so difficult to translate…”, but when I came home after the meeting I “jumped in” and translated a few pages. I sent them to Dimitri and to an editor-friend. Both found the sample good. And that’s how I got caught up in the game, without even having a guarantee of being able to finance the translation. For the rights acquisition, we received grants from the Institut français and directly from the French Embassy in Ireland.

Dimitri used emotional blackmail, saying: “Only you, Svet, can play my music in English.” It always works, emotional blackmail! As a result, I threw myself into that crazy venture practically “without a safety net”…

Of course, the pandemic has brought about major difficulties, and even if we wanted the book to come out in 2020, we haven’t as yet been able to have a proper launch. We’ll do it as soon as possible – soon enough, I hope… In any case, we’ll change the date as many times as needed, but we’ll have our launch, with the unfailing support of the French Embassy and the Alliance française in Dublin.

Svetlana Pironko at the Frankfurt Book Fair, 2019. © Svetlana Pironko

Isn’t it a very different form of collaboration?

Svetlana: It is going to sound incredible, but apart from a few “adjustments” at the very beginning, which I will mention later on, we didn’t have any particular difficulties. I didn’t have the impression that I was “translating”, as it was the case with other translations, no matter the languages I was translating into or from. I had the impression that I was “channelling” his writing, almost like a medium. It was a strange – sort of fluid – experience…

I think that our affinities, our common roots and some common experiences, I would even say some common trials, played a part in that. The ability to understand and “feel” the text deeply, beyond the words…

Obviously, living in an English-speaking country for fifteen years and editing manuscripts in English must have helped!

Our way of working together was simple: I would translate a dozen pages and send them to Dimitri, sometimes with specific questions, including the punctuation (a big topic!), sometimes without any questions at all. Dimitri would read and we would discuss it on the phone, if needed. Luckily, I was able to come to Paris right after the first lockdown and we could look at the translation – almost completed by then – together. We were meeting in the Montparnasse graveyard to work… It was quite appropriate.

Strangely, it was the first difficulty, page 8 of the French edition, that suggested the title. This sentence, in bold:

« Ça m’a calmé. J’étais calme. Calme… Plus d’âme à pêcher. On atteint le fond des choses. Si lentement. On plonge. Si doucement on touche le fond. Quand vous enviez les morts. »

“It calmed me. I was calm. Calm… No more souls to catch. You reach the bottom of things. So slowly. You go down. So gently you touch the bottom. When you envy the dead.”

When Dimitri explained that he was referring to the Bible story of the miraculous catch, repeatedly, the title Soul Catcher practically imposed itself.

Just two more examples :

« Mon fils… Le filet à pêcher mon âme. Quand je pense à sa mort. Mon cœur de nuit. Mon jour. Mes crépuscules… Ma lune… Toi. Quand tu mourras… Je pense à ta mort et. Suis là. Avec toi. »

“My son. The net to catch my soul. When I think of his death. My night heart. My day. My twilight… My moon… You… When you die… I think of your death and. I’m here. With you.”

« Rien à saisir. Chante-moi ça… Pour mes vieux jours – chante. Rien à apporter. Les âmes n’ont pas de poches. Larmes rentrez chez vous. Par-delà ce soir je vous vois… Les morts. Rien n’est saisi. Rien n’est caché. Une ombre n’a pas de poches. »

“Nothing to catch. Sing this to me… For my old days – sing. Nothing to bring. Souls have no pockets. Tears, go back to where you come from. Beyond this evening I see… the dead. Nothing to grasp. Nothing to hide. A shadow has no pockets.”

The main difficulty was, I think, to find and keep the rhythm, as Dimitri’s writing is very musical.

I couldn’t work on the translation without interruptions, as I was doing it “in my spare time”, so to speak, on top of my duties as a publisher. I had to dive into the text, come out, dive again and keep “the music” and the emotion intact.

Emotion, precisely, was another difficulty: some passages, not necessarily technically difficult to translate, were trying psychologically. I hope to have preserved their emotional impact, like in this excerpt, for example:

« Pauvre ! Pauvre bête… Sans relâche on l’a traquée. Pas de répit ! En meute. Comme des loups.

On l’a encerclée ! Une vraie science… La sagesse de la survie. Des loups. Comme des jeunes loups on l’a traquée. Jusqu’au bout. Jusqu’à ce qu’elle s’effondre… C’était pas un pékinois ! Un berger allemand. Une vraie. Une chienne très intelligente. Nerveuse. Mais là… Elle pouvait rien. Une meute de soldats… Une meute d’hommes… Elle pouvait rien. Courir… Oui. Elle a couru… Couru… Ça durait ! Nom de dieu, ça durait…

Des heures cette chasse ! La chienne… Sept soldats affamés ! Sept soldats devenus fous de faim… Faim canine ! Sept jeunes hommes et la chienne… Imprudente. Son instinct l’a trahie. Trahie elle était perdue d’avance. Elle pouvait se battre ? Une chienne qui avait l’homme pour maître ne peut rien. Rien… Contre un homme qui est devenu fou – rien.

On l’a achevée en barbares. Deux canifs, les bottes et des bâtons. Elle voulait se cacher, elle avait trop peur, elle a trouvé une fente mais non – trop petite… Et là – elle s’est retournée. Oui. Livrer sa dernière bataille ? Vendre sa peau plus cher ? Non… Elle a rampé vers nous. La queue entre les jambes. En chiot elle rampait… En chialant… Mon sang. Elle pleurait… Ses yeux ! Vivre ! Elle voulait vivre ! Vivre…

Fous. On était fous. Tous… Trois fois fous. Des semelles pourries jusqu’aux têtes. Et plus haut… Plus haut. L’air et la neige ! Tout est devenu fou. On a tout empesté. Et tout ce qu’on a contaminé nous a regardés… On avait froid dans le ventre. Puis on a marché en se taisant. Sans se regarder. Chacun portait sa portion de la chair de cette chienne pour la dévorer derrière la caserne.

Je ne sais pas dire la mort en yakoute. On avait chié dans nos caleçons pour avoir chaud. Chaud oui. Pour avoir le cul au chaud. On avait chié et puis ça tenait chaud la merde. On restait comme ça quelques jours la merde collée. Jusqu’au jour de la douche. »

“Poor! Poor beast… Relentlessly we tracked her. No respite! In a pack. Like wolves. Surrounded her! A real science… The wisdom of survival. Of wolves. Like young wolves we hunted her. To the end. Until she collapsed…

It wasn’t a Pekinese! A German shepherd. A true one. A very intelligent bitch. Nervous. But there… There was nothing she could do. A pack of soldiers… A pack of men… Nothing she could do. Run… Yes. She ran. Ran. It went on and on! Bloody hell, it went on… Hours of hunt! The bitch… Seven starving soldiers! Seven soldiers mad from hunger… Ravenous like wolves. Seven young men and the bitch… Imprudent. Her instinct betrayed her. Betrayed she was doomed. Could she have fought? A dog that had a man as a master can do nothing. Nothing against a man gone mad – nothing.

We finished her like barbarians. Two penknives, boots and sticks. She wanted to hide, she was too scared, she found a crevasse but no – too small… And then – she turned around. Yes. To fight the last battle? To sell her skin dearly? No… She crawled towards us. Her tail between her legs. Like a pup she crawled… Crying… My blood. She was crying… Her eyes! To live! She wanted to live! Live…

Mad. We were mad. All… Triple mad. From our rotten soles to our heads. And above… Above. The air and the snow! Everything had gone mad. We plagued everything. And everything we contaminated was watching us… We felt a chill in our stomachs. Afterwards we walked without talking. Without looking at each other. Each was carrying a piece of the flesh of that bitch to gobble up behind the barracks.

I don’t know how to say death in Yakut. We shit in our pants to keep warm. Warm yes. To keep the arse warm. We would shit and it would keep us warm the shit. We would stay like this for a few days covered in shit. Until shower day.”

Dimitri: I trust Svetlana and her knowledge of English completely. And she has a rhythm, something, that “je-ne-sais-quoi” that are just there. She’s like a fish in my text, and who am I to teach a fish how to swim?

And now?…

Svetlana: As a publisher, I hope to be able to purchase the English-language rights to Dimitri’s forthcoming novel Une histoire vraie, that will be released by Payot-Rivages in August. I hope, of course, to be able to work on the translation with Dimitri. And, since I’m still a little bit agent in my heart, I hope to find an American publisher for Soul Catcher and (knock wood) for his new novel, too.

And also, as I said, we are going to organise a launch in Dublin, with Dimitri, as soon as the pandemic situation allows it.

Dimitri: I, too – I hope. I have nothing else. I hope with a hope that comes after hope. Sometimes an effort is not enough – you need a super-effort. Like super-courage. Hope after there is no more hope… That’s the thing.

Translated from French by Svetlana Pironko.

____________________

Traduire l’âme sœur : entretien avec Dimitri Bortnikov et Svetlana Pironko (Betimes Books)

Dimitri Bortnikov. © Svetlana Pironko

Svetlana Pironko, qui a fondé les éditions Betimes Books (“I chose long-sellers over bestsellers” ), vient de publier en Irlande sa traduction de Repas de morts (Soul Catcher), de Dimitri Bortnikov , dont elle a été l’agent il y a une vingtaine d’années.


Svetlana, Dimitri, vous vous êtes rencontrés il y a une vingtaine d’années… Quelles furent les circonstances de cette rencontre ?

Svetlana : Nous nous sommes rencontrés par hasard, dans des circonstances qui n’avaient rien avoir avec l’édition. Nous avons aidé, chacun de notre côté, un couple d’amis français dans leurs démarches d’adoption en Russie. Lorsqu’ils ont adopté un petit garçon, ils nous ont invités à déjeuner, pour nous le présenter et pour nous remercier. Ils savaient que Dimitri était écrivain et moi agent littéraire, et que nous avions plus que nos origines en commun. Mais pour chacun de nous c’était une surprise. Je connaissais Dimitri de nom, car il était déjà finaliste de deux grands prix littéraires russes pour son premier roman, mais je ne l’avais pas encore lu. Quelques jours après cette rencontre, Dimitri m’a envoyé ce roman. Je l’ai lu d’une traite et je l’ai appelé le lendemain pour lui proposer de le représenter en France. Il a accepté.

Dimitri : De cette rencontre-là – je n’ai aucun souvenir. Aucun. Vide. Un trou dans le calendrier. Je n’ai pas beaucoup de souvenirs… Parfois je me dis qu’un mort-né en aurait bien plus. Ah oui. En revanche je me rappelle parfaitement le jour où j’ai vu Svetlana pour la première fois dans son élément. Dans son agence. Ça – oui. Je lui ai dédicacé Syndrome de Fritz. Dans un café, pas loin de l’agence. Vraiment à côté, oui… À une clope de distance. C’est bizarre, la mémoire… Je me souviens de sa robe, très très légère, de son bronzage, et de ma dédicace. Et puis on a signé le contrat et tout ça et tout ça.

Et puis, grâce à Svetlana, mon deuxième bouquin a été traduit en français, et il est sorti au Seuil. 

Qu’est-ce qui vous a menés, l’une vers le travail d’agent, l’autre vers l’écriture ?

Svetlana : Après des études à l’École supérieure d’interprètes de traducteurs à Paris-Dauphine, j’ai travaillé comme traductrice-interprète indépendante, essentiellement pour des organisations internationales et des entreprises françaises. J’étais spécialisée en traduction juridique et économique. C’était passionnant, mais après une dizaine d’années, j’ai eu envie de retourner à mes « premières amours » – les livres, la littérature. Je voulais ouvrir une librairie à Paris, mais comme cela n’a pas pu se faire pour des raisons « logistiques », j’ai décidé de faire un Mastère spécialisé « Management de l’édition » à l’École supérieure de commerce de Paris. Après le mastère, le premier boulot que j’ai trouvé, c’était dans une agence littéraire. J’avais plutôt envie d’être éditrice, mais je me suis dit que vendre des droits de traduction était une façon de vendre des livres – de les faire voyager aussi, en quelque sorte… Au bout de neuf mois, je suis devenue associée à l’Agence littéraire Lora Fountain & Associates à Paris. C’est là que je travaillais lorsque j’ai rencontré Dimitri.

Dimitri : Ce que je faisais à cette époque-là… Pas grand-chose. Sûrement je gribouillais, mais comme ça, sans trop d’insistance… Je m’occupais de mon fils. Ça – oui. Et comment ! Mais la littérature – non, pas tant que ça… Et puis j’ai travaillé aussi chez une comtesse russe, je faisais la cuisine. Ou c’était avant… Je ne sais plus. Et puis je vais vous dire, c’est plus facile pour l’homme de trouver un vieux pantalon dans lequel on a jamais pété que de retrouver ses vrais souvenirs. Vraiment ! Regardez Proust…

Svetlana : Là je dois apporter une petite précision pour rétablir « la vérité historique » ! Dimitri travaillait à l’époque sur un nouveau roman, La Belle Endormie, dont je me suis occupée en tant qu’agent et qui a été publié en Russie en 2005. La traduction française paraîtra bientôt aux éditions Noir sur blanc. La Belle Endormie reste un de mes romans préférés de Dimitri. Je ne peux donc pas le laisser sous silence !

Votre relation littéraire s’est-elle tissée en partie autour de vos racines russes et/ou est-européennes ?

Svetlana : Je suis née et j’ai grandi en Asie Centrale, au Kazakhstan. J’avais 15 ans lorsque ma famille a déménagé dans le sud de la Russie. Je suis russe de culture, mais ce n’est pas un pays où je me sens chez moi. J’ai commencé à apprendre le français assez jeune, par choix. J’avais décidé que je voulais vivre à Paris un jour, suite à des lectures « corruptrices » (Paris est un fête, pour nommer le coupable). Je suis venue à Paris à l’âge de 24 ans, non sans aventures. Il y a donc une trentaine d’années… Avant la dissolution de l’Union soviétique. C’est à Paris que je me sens vraiment chez moi. Le français est ma langue de cœur – comme a dit Albert Camus, « ma patrie, c’est la langue française ».

Notre relation littéraire s’est-elle tissée autour de nos racines russes ? Au début – forcément. Je n’aurais pas pu lire le premier roman de Dimitri et devenir son agent si je ne parlais pas le russe et n’entretenais pas une certaine familiarité ou une certaine sensibilité vis-à-vis des réalités qu’il décrivait. D’ailleurs, on n’aurait pas pu se rencontrer dans les mêmes circonstances… Parfois, la vie fait bien les choses. Mais je pense que nos affinités littéraires vont au-delà de nos origines. D’autant que nos expériences respectives de vie aussi bien en Union soviétique qu’en France ont été très différentes.

Dimitri : Je suis né en Russie, à Samara. Mais jamais, au grand jamais, au gigantesque jamais – je ne voulais devenir écrivain. Tout – mais pas ça… Médecin – oui. Chimiste – oui. Mais la littérature, surtout pour la produire – c’était niet. Ce n’est pas pour rien que j’aime Nietzsche ! Son nom commence par Niet ! Trêve de dimitreries… Sérieusement – je suis l’homme d’un autre temps. D’un très autre temps. Tout ce qui est ancien – oui. Socrate – oui. Bach – oh que oui ! Villon – oui deux fois. Shakespeare – Da trois fois ! Hamlet ! Richard III ! Les étoiles filantes ! Et surtout, surtout – la Bible. Ça, alors – jamais las ! Voilà. Le reste – non… je vous jure ! Que je ne bande qu’en bonsaï le reste de ma vie, si je mens… Littérature contemporaine et sa sciure… Non. Tous montrent le fond de leur culotte et nia-nia-nia et co-co-co… C’est comique parfois et ridicule – toujours. Ce qui m’intéresse à la rigueur – c’est ce qui précède le langage. Ce silence avant que l’âme humaine ne s’habille de mots. Ou ne s’en dévêtisse… Quelque chose comme ça…

Depuis, vous ne vous êtes donc jamais perdus de vue… Quelle a été l’évolution de votre relation littéraire jusqu’à aujourd’hui ?

Svetlana : Presque pas – il y a eu des périodes où les aléas de nos vies personnelles faisaient que nous ne nous voyions pas beaucoup, mais jamais été « loin des yeux, loin du cœur ». J’ai toujours suivi la carrière de Dimitri, même quand j’ai cessé d’être son agent, après mon départ pour Dublin il y a quinze ans. C’est vers la même période que Dimitri s’est mis à écrire en français.

Mais je n’ai jamais renoncé à le faire publier en langue anglaise. J’ai de la suite dans les idées !

Dimitri : Ma carrière… C’est tout de même drôle ! Un pou a plus de « carrière », lui ! Mais c’est vrai ce que tu dis, Svet… Surtout pour « J’ai de la suite dans les idées! »

Mais, traductrice et éditrice, ce n’est quand même pas la même chose qu’amie et agent ?

Svetlana : Lorsque j’ai été agent, je rêvais de faire publier Dimitri en anglais. Quand je suis devenue éditrice, je me suis mise à rêver de le publier moi-même, dès que les finances de la maison d’édition le permettraient. J’en avais parlé à Dimitri d’ailleurs, et il était partant. Mais l’idée de traduire son roman entier moi-même ne m’avait pas traversé l’esprit avant janvier 2020, où j’ai rencontré l’attachée culturelle de l’Ambassade de France en Irlande Miriam Diallo et sa collègue Stéphanie Muchint, en charge de la littérature.

Elles ont soutenu avec enthousiasme l’idée de publier en Irlande des auteurs français, et ce sont elles qui ont choisi Dimitri Bortnikov parmi les cinq noms que j’avais sur ma liste. À ma grande joie.

L’année 2020 était celle du 50ème anniversaire de la francophonie, et elles voulaient le marquer par le lancement d’un livre traduit du français et publié en Irlande à l’Alliance française de Dublin. L’idée m’a enchantée, mais… soulevait deux problèmes : le temps (le délai de traduction) et l’argent (le délai de financement). Comme c’est souvent le cas…

C’est Stéphanie Muchint qui a suggéré que je fasse la traduction moi-même. Spontanément, j’ai dit : « Oh, non, je ne pourrais jamais le faire – Dimitri est si difficile à traduire… » Mais en rentrant chez moi après ce rendez-vous, j’ai « plongé » et traduit quelques pages. Je les ai envoyées à Dimitri et à une amie éditrice. Les deux ont trouvé l’échantillon très bon. Et c’est comme cela que je me suis prise au jeu, sans avoir un sou ni même la garantie de pouvoir financer la traduction (pour l’acquisition des droits, nous avons été aidés par l’Institut français et par une subvention directe de l’Ambassade de France).

Dimitri m’a fait du chantage affectif, en disant : « Il n’y a que toi, Svet, qui peut jouer ma musique en anglais. » Cela marche toujours, le chantage affectif ! Résultat : je me suis lancée dans cette folle entreprise pratiquement « sans filet »…

Bien sûr, la pandémie a changé la donne, et même si l’on tenait à ce que le livre paraisse en 2020, nous n’avons pas encore pu faire un vrai lancement. Partie remise – pas pour trop longtemps, j’espère… En tout cas, nous reculerons la date autant de fois qu’il le faudra, mais il aura lieu. Nous avons toujours le soutien de l’Ambassade de France et de l’Alliance française Dublin.

N’est-ce pas aussi une forme très différente de collaboration ?

Svetlana : Cela va sembler incroyable, mais à part quelques « ajustements » au tout début, dont je parlerai plus tard, nous n’avons pas eu de difficultés particulières. Je n’avais pas l’impression de « traduire », comme cela pouvait être le cas avec d’autres traductions, quelles que soient les langues de départ et d’arrivée. J’avais l’impression de « canaliser » son écriture, presque comme un médium. C’était une expérience étrange, fluide…

Je pense que c’est là que nos affinités, nos racines communes et certaines expériences communes, je dirais même, certaines épreuves similaires, ont joué un rôle. Le fait de comprendre et de ressentir profondément le texte, au-delà des mots…

Bien évidemment, vivre dans un pays anglophone depuis quinze ans et éditer des manuscrits en anglais a dû aider !

Notre façon de travailler ensemble a été simple : je traduisais une dizaine de pages et je les envoyais à Dimitri, parfois avec des questions spécifiques, y compris sur la ponctuation (un grand sujet de discussion !), mais parfois sans questions aussi. Dimitri lisait, et on en parlait, si besoin était, au téléphone. Heureusement, j’ai pu venir à Paris après le premier confinement, ce qui nous a permis de regarder la traduction – pratiquement terminée à ce moment-là – ensemble. On se retrouvait au cimetière de Montparnasse pour travailler… C’était très approprié !

Curieusement, c’est la première difficulté, sur la page 8 de l’édition française, qui a suggéré le choix du titre. Il s’agissait de cette phrase, en gras :

« Ça m’a calmé. J’étais calme. Calme… Plus d’âme à pêcher. On atteint le fond des choses. Si lentement. On plonge. Si doucement on touche le fond. Quand vous enviez les morts. »

“It calmed me. I was calm. Calm… No more souls to catch. You reach the bottom of things. So slowly. You go down. So gently you touch the bottom. When you envy the dead.”

Quand Dimitri m’a expliqué qu’il faisait référence à la pêche miraculeuse dans la Bible, et que cette référence revenait à plusieurs reprises dans le roman, le titre Soul Catcher a semblé évident.

Juste deux autres exemples :

« Mon fils… Le filet à pêcher mon âme. Quand je pense à sa mort. Mon cœur de nuit. Mon jour. Mes crépuscules… Ma lune… Toi. Quand tu mourras… Je pense à ta mort et. Suis là. Avec toi. »

“My son. The net to catch my soul. When I think of his death. My night heart. My day. My twilight… My moon… You… When you die… I think of your death and. I’m here. With you.”

« Rien à saisir. Chante-moi ça… Pour mes vieux jours – chante. Rien à apporter. Les âmes n’ont pas de poches. Larmes rentrez chez vous. Par-delà ce soir je vous vois… Les morts. Rien n’est saisi. Rien n’est caché. Une ombre n’a pas de poches. »

“Nothing to catch. Sing this to me… For my old days – sing. Nothing to bring. Souls have no pockets. Tears, go back to where you come from. Beyond this evening I see… the dead. Nothing to grasp. Nothing to hide. A shadow has no pockets.”

La difficulté principale était, me semble-t-il, de trouver et surtout de garder le rythme, car l’écriture de Dimitri est très musicale. Je ne pouvais pas travailler sur la traduction sans interruption, car je la faisais « à mes heures perdues », pour ainsi dire, en plus de mon travail d’éditrice. Il fallait donc plonger dans le texte, sortir, replonger, ressortir et garder « la musique » et l’émotion intactes.

L’émotion, justement, était l’autre difficulté de cette traduction : certains passages, pas forcément difficiles techniquement parlant, étaient éprouvants psychologiquement. J’espère avoir réussi à conserver leur impact émotionnel, comme dans cet extrait-ci, par exemple :

« Pauvre ! Pauvre bête… Sans relâche on l’a traquée. Pas de répit ! En meute. Comme des loups.

On l’a encerclée ! Une vraie science… La sagesse de la survie. Des loups. Comme des jeunes loups on l’a traquée. Jusqu’au bout. Jusqu’à ce qu’elle s’effondre… C’était pas un pékinois ! Un berger allemand. Une vraie. Une chienne très intelligente. Nerveuse. Mais là… Elle pouvait rien. Une meute de soldats… Une meute d’hommes… Elle pouvait rien. Courir… Oui. Elle a couru… Couru… Ça durait ! Nom de dieu, ça durait…

Des heures cette chasse ! La chienne… Sept soldats affamés ! Sept soldats devenus fous de faim… Faim canine ! Sept jeunes hommes et la chienne… Imprudente. Son instinct l’a trahie. Trahie elle était perdue d’avance. Elle pouvait se battre ? Une chienne qui avait l’homme pour maître ne peut rien. Rien… Contre un homme qui est devenu fou – rien.

On l’a achevée en barbares. Deux canifs, les bottes et des bâtons. Elle voulait se cacher, elle avait trop peur, elle a trouvé une fente mais non – trop petite… Et là – elle s’est retournée. Oui. Livrer sa dernière bataille ? Vendre sa peau plus cher ? Non… Elle a rampé vers nous. La queue entre les jambes. En chiot elle rampait… En chialant… Mon sang. Elle pleurait… Ses yeux ! Vivre ! Elle voulait vivre ! Vivre…

Fous. On était fous. Tous… Trois fois fous. Des semelles pourries jusqu’aux têtes. Et plus haut… Plus haut. L’air et la neige ! Tout est devenu fou. On a tout empesté. Et tout ce qu’on a contaminé nous a regardés… On avait froid dans le ventre. Puis on a marché en se taisant. Sans se regarder. Chacun portait sa portion de la chair de cette chienne pour la dévorer derrière la caserne.

Je ne sais pas dire la mort en yakoute. On avait chié dans nos caleçons pour avoir chaud. Chaud oui. Pour avoir le cul au chaud. On avait chié et puis ça tenait chaud la merde. On restait comme ça quelques jours la merde collée. Jusqu’au jour de la douche. »

“Poor! Poor beast… Relentlessly we tracked her. No respite! In a pack. Like wolves. Surrounded her! A real science… The wisdom of survival. Of wolves. Like young wolves we hunted her. To the end. Until she collapsed…

It wasn’t a Pekinese! A German shepherd. A true one. A very intelligent bitch. Nervous. But there… There was nothing she could do. A pack of soldiers… A pack of men… Nothing she could do. Run… Yes. She ran. Ran. It went on and on! Bloody hell, it went on… Hours of hunt! The bitch… Seven starving soldiers! Seven soldiers mad from hunger… Ravenous like wolves. Seven young men and the bitch… Imprudent. Her instinct betrayed her. Betrayed she was doomed. Could she have fought? A dog that had a man as a master can do nothing. Nothing against a man gone mad – nothing.

We finished her like barbarians. Two penknives, boots and sticks. She wanted to hide, she was too scared, she found a crevasse but no – too small… And then – she turned around. Yes. To fight the last battle? To sell her skin dearly? No… She crawled towards us. Her tail between her legs. Like a pup she crawled… Crying… My blood. She was crying… Her eyes! To live! She wanted to live! Live…

Mad. We were mad. All… Triple mad. From our rotten soles to our heads. And above… Above. The air and the snow! Everything had gone mad. We plagued everything. And everything we contaminated was watching us… We felt a chill in our stomachs. Afterwards we walked without talking. Without looking at each other. Each was carrying a piece of the flesh of that bitch to gobble up behind the barracks.

I don’t know how to say death in Yakut. We shit in our pants to keep warm. Warm yes. To keep the arse warm. We would shit and it would keep us warm the shit. We would stay like this for a few days covered in shit. Until shower day.”

Dimitri : J’ai toute ma confiance dans l’anglais de Svetlana. Et puis elle a un rythme, quelque chose, ce je ne sais quoi qui est là. Elle est dans mon texte comme un poisson dans l’eau, et qui suis-je pour apprendre à nager à un poisson ?!

Et maintenant ?…

Svetlana : En tant qu’éditrice, j’espère pouvoir acquérir les droits de langue anglaise pour le nouveau roman de Dimitri, Une histoire vraie, qui sortira chez Payot-Rivages au mois d’août. J’espère, bien sûr, pouvoir travailler sur la traduction avec Dimitri. Et, comme je suis encore un peu agent dans l’âme, j’espère trouver un éditeur américain pour Soul Catcher et (je touche du bois) pour le nouveau roman aussi.

Et puis, comme j’ai dit, nous allons organiser la venue de Dimitri à Dublin et un lancement de Soul Catcher dès que la situation épidémique le permettra.

Dimitri : Moi aussi – je l’espère. Et puis je n’ai rien d’autre. J’espère d’un espoir qui vient après l’espoir. Parfois un effort ne suffit plus, alors – il faut un sur-effort. Comme un sur-courage. L’espoir d’après l’espoir… Voilà la chose.

Votre commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

<span>%d</span> blogueurs aiment cette page :